The Secret Beauty of Constant Practice

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The Secret Beauty of Constant Practice

The Crack of Grace

The yogic tradition says that there is a hiatus in any cycle, a crack through which an abundance of light comes. It’s an impetus, a pure energy, a sense of enthusiasm, spanda.

Intuitively, we feel it when we wish each other a better new year. Such a wish is like creating a new wave on which to surf…

But we can welcome this hiatus in a wiser way. First, we can evoke last year while asking “Who am I?.” This is a way of zooming out and considering not only our actions but how and if our soul was uplifted.

Then, as we look forward and envision this year, we understand that ultimately, we don’t seek to fulfill some new desires or hopes, but to cultivate a thirst for freedom, balance, love, and beauty

How Destiny Is Changed

Yoga tells us that future suffering, agami karma, can and should be avoided. How? By the wisdom of detachment, remaining as the Witness, the Heart, not just through some new year wishes—wishes will not really change destiny.

Therefore, this is a time of commitment to Reality and the intention to be truly present. Nourish a pure longing to engage in life as it is, not as you hope or wish it to be. In each moment, the only available choice is: Do you want Reality, Truth, Beauty, Love, God, or something else?

Mining Beauty from the Depths of the Heart

Spiritual sadhana requires regular time, attention, passion, and dedication. Commit to meditation and see it not just as a practice but as a way of honoring and loving yourself, nourishing the beauty of your soul, realizing that you are much more than just the body/mind.

So, meditating once per week is not okay. We can’t really put aside Self-Awareness and Self-Love, just as we can’t ignore breathing or eating or sleeping. It is self-sabotage.

Make a choice to practice, to quench this thirst for Self-Awareness—no one else can do it for you. What matters most is not the length of your meditations, but their regularity.

Practice and Life Mirror Each Other

Our spiritual practice reflects the approach we have to life. If it’s erratic or based on whims and sudden moods, our life will follow in the same way. A regular meditation practice is a reflection, an outward manifestation, of the way our mind functions. Make it stable, focused, present, and aware regardless of the circumstances.

Meditation isn’t a getaway from life, but the very aliveness at its core—being in the Heart. Sometimes we may believe that we are too busy to meditate, but how can we be too busy to be Self-Aware, to know who we really are?

Bringing daily life into spirituality, placing a higher value at the center of life, means that it’s best to meditate at the same time every day. Stability, joy, and harmony in life can come when a well-balanced daily schedule grows naturally around meditation and yoga practice.

Steadiness through Fluctuation

The constancy of the spiritual journey isn’t about always being good and equanimous without faltering. It is mostly about stumbling, over and over, but witnessing it, coming back to the Heart, again and again.

Life is a play made up of commonplace daily events and unexpected occurrences—grace or challenges. To live in constancy is to welcome and embrace both in the vastness of the Heart. In this way, we awaken to the mystery of being here, now and enter the quiet immensity of our own presence.

What Are We Mostly Missing Today?

Much of the stress and emptiness that haunts people in our times ultimately comes from a lack of attention to the Heart—to love, wonderment, sacredness, and beauty.

Our current situation shows that the Spiritual Heart demands for itself at least as much dedication, courage, and energy as people did when they fought for justice, truth, and freedom…

The time is ripe for spanda, the Sacred Tremor of the Heart, to surprise and liberate us.

By Sahajananda, the founder of Hridaya Yoga.

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